The 5 Health-Investor Archetypes

Most body optimization journeys root in that moment of clarity triggered by an outer shock, like an ill medical diagnosis or the sudden loss of a loved one. The call for change sets things into perspective and shifts the innate machinery from passive to action. This inspiration is the only common point as others on the same quest. Every decision made afterward shapes one’s unique path towards a healthier body.

Take a second to remember the first time you invested money in your health. Many joined a gym or bought sneakers; some picked up a fitness magazine filled with workout secrets and pictures of their dream physique. Now, was that initial investment enough to accomplish your goals?

The answer is no for the many of us who are still engaged in the process today. There had to be another health-investment, then a third and even a fourth. You hire a personal trainer when you realize how complex the body and a gym can be, or buy a set of dumbbells for the basement because the shoes aren’t enough. That magazine program turns into a weekend seminar with the professional who wrote it. Your financial decisions evolve as your body progresses over time.

Distinct patterns emerge amongst health-investors, as with all branches of the human nature. These recurring traits are influenced by personality more than investment potential. Someone with a massive wealth might spend less on health than the average worker. Others with few resources go all-in to initiate a major lifestyle shift and grow their funds along with it. There are countless potential scenarios.

Sun Tzy taught you will win one hundred battles if you know your enemy and yourself in The Art Of War. The same principle applies to health investments. Make the right monetary choices with an awareness of who you are and what you need. Here are the five investor archetypes typically encountered:

1. Do It Myself

The first archetype prefers solitude throughout the journey. These lone wolves learn and apply things on their own because they need to be in control. They work at their pace and will only seek the help of others when they find themselves at a dead end.

  • Pros

The Do-It-Myself archetype is independent. Solitude provides greater freedom to experiment and find a winning combination. Results satisfy to a higher degree because they stem from their research.

  • Cons

Nobody can see everything, especially in the context of health. They are limited to what they know, and that can be a fatal flaw if left unchecked. The process requires dedication, patience, and consumes time like a black hole.

  • Optimal Health-Investments

This archetype benefits most from education platforms like seminars, online courses, and books. Mobile technology allows them to collect and store important health data to monitor their progress. They also invest in equipment to build their private workout lab at home or the office.

 

2. Tell Me What To Do

The second archetype needs someone else to tell them what to do because of other obligations and interests that require an external source of health education. They hire a wide range of professionals to do the dirty work for them.

  • Pros

The process saves time and reaps the benefits of human interactions while furthering their health and education.

  • Cons

They can only be as good as their teachers, and regular work with professionals can get expensive over time.

  • Optimal Health-Investments

Professional services.

 

3. Trend Adepts

The third archetype follows the lights; they invest in popularity. All their decisions root in the chatter around a product or service.

  • Pros

New trends can be great. Evolution is necessary.

  • Cons

New trends can be disastrous. Some things are better left the way they are.

  • Optimal Health-Investments

Trend followers invest in popular products and professional services.

 

4.All Eggs In One Basket

The fourth archetype is similar to the previous two, except all their resources go to one guru.

  • Pros

The results can be remarkable if they invest in the right basket.

  • Cons

They can only be as good as their guru.

  • Optimal Health-Investments

As per their scriptures.

 

5.Professionals

The fifth archetype is a professional who manages the health and lifestyle of his clients on top of their own. Their bread and butter depends on the image they convey and the results produced. They must not only invest in themselves but also in their business.

  • Pros

Health and wealth gains as you help others.

  • Cons

The process is expensive and time-consuming, requires dedication and sacrifices for a life of health care.

  • Optimal Health-Investments

Continuing education is the most valuable investment for this archetype. Equipment is essential, as are all other costs of starting a healthcare or fitness business.

 

Do you recognize yourself in any of them?